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Thursday, September 25, 2003
 


<br />Isaac Asimov Home Page <br />







ASIMOV


Isaac Asimov Home Page



Welcome to the Isaac Asimov Home Page. Here you'll find a comprehensive collection of resources pertaining to Isaac Asimov (1920-1992), the quintessential author, who in his lifetime wrote over 500 books that enlightened, entertained, and spanned the realm of human knowledge.





The Isaac Asimov FAQ


The FAQ for the Usenet newsgroup alt.books.isaac-asimov provides answers to the frequently asked questions about Isaac Asimov, and is an excellent place to start if you have questions about him. Included is biographical information about both his personal life and his literary life, answers to questions about the Foundation and Robot series, and more.



For a German translation of the FAQ, see Bálint Krizsán's site.






New Black Widower's Collection: The Return of the Black Widowers







[The Return of the Black Widowers] A new collection of Isaac Asimov's Black Widower mystery stories will be published by Carroll & Graf in November 2003. The Return of the Black Widowers will feature six stories that have never appeared in a Black Widowers's collection, plus ten of the best previously collected Black Widower stories. It will also include an introduction by Asimov's close friend, author Harlan Ellison; a pastiche about the Black Widowers; and an essay by Asimov about how he came to write the Black Widowers stories. Also appearing in the collection is a new Black Widowers story, "The Last Story", written by Charles Ardai, the editor of the collection, for the December 2002 issue of Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine, to commemorate the tenth anniversary of Asimov's death and the thirtieth anniversary of the publication of the first Black Widowers story.



The Return of the Black Widowers can be pre-ordered from amazon.com.







Autobiography: It's Been a Good Life







[It's Been a Good Life] In late March, 2002, Prometheus Books published It's Been a Good Life, an autobiography edited by Janet Jeppson Asimov. The new book was compiled from selections made from the three previous autobiographical volumes In Memory Yet Green (1979), In Joy Still Felt (1980), and I. Asimov: A Memoir (1994). The book also features "A Way of Thinking", Asimov's 400th essay for the Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, which Janet put together from conversations they had and letters they had exchanged during many years of correspondence. In addition, there are excerpts from those letters sprinkled throughout the book. The result is a portrait of the life of Isaac Asimov, the writer, humanist, thinker, wit, and bon vivant, which lovingly illustrates why he was able to truthfully say "It's been a good life".



The book also includes an epilogue in which Janet Jeppson Asimov reveals for the first time that Isaac's 1992 death from heart and kidney failure was a consequence of AIDS contracted from a transfusion of tainted blood during his December 1983 triple-bypass operation. She explains how and when he learned he had the disease, and why his doctors convinced him to keep it a secret from the public. The epilogue includes a description of Asimov's final days, together with some poignant passages that describe his views of life and death.


[There have been some erroneous published reports stating that it was Janet Asimov who convinced her husband to keep the fact that he had contracted AIDS a secret. This is absolutely untrue. In fact it was Asimov's doctors who urged that the matter be kept a secret. See Janet's April 4, 2002 letter to Locus magazine.]



The book can be purchased online from amazon.com or Barnes and Noble.








The Isaac Asimov Memorial Panel Debate


Janet and Robyn Asimov, working with the American Museum of Natural History in New York City, established the Isaac Asimov Fund to support the annual Isaac Asimov Memorial Panel Debate as part of the Museum's Hayden Planetarium Programs. The third annual debate took place on the evening of April 22, 2003 in the museum's LeFrak Theater, and for the third successive year was presented to a sold-out auditorium.



The topic of the third debate was "The Big Bang", and featured five of the world's leading cosmologists who discussed our knowledge and ignorance of the events that resulted in the birth of the universe.



The panelists were Alan Guth, Professor of Physics at MIT, who invented the inflationary theory of the universe; James E. Peebles, Professor of Science Emeritus at Princeton University, and author of texts on cosmology and the structure of the universe; Lee Smolin, founding member and researcher at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Waterloo, Canada, who invented the theory called cosmological natural selection; David Spergel, Professor of Astrophysical Sciences at Princeton University, and leader of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Science Team for detecting planets around other stars; and Paul Steinhardt, Professor of Science at Princeton University, who developed the "quintessence" model of dark energy. The debate was once again moderated by Neil DeGrasse Tyson, the Frederick P. Rose Director of the Hayden Planetarium.



The first debate, on the "Theory of Everything", took place at the museum on February 13, 2001, and the second debate, on "The Search For Life in the Universe", was held June 10, 2002.



Thanks to the many contributors, the Isaac Asimov Memorial Fund continues to grow. If you would like to participate in this extraordinary opportunity to perpetuate Isaac's memory and support the cause of science education, please read the details.



An article from Rotunda, the newsletter of the American Museum of Natural History in New York City, profiles the career of Dr. Janet Jeppson Asimov, her involvement with the museum, and the establishment of the Isaac Asimov Memorial Fund.





Items of Interest



Isaac Asimov's Birthplace


Isaac Asimov was born in Petrovichi, Russia, in 1920. Petrovichi is very proud of their native son, and have honored the place of his birth with a memorial stone. A picture was supplied by Alexander Azimov, who is almost certainly a relative of Isaac's.




Essays by Johnny Pez


Johnny Pez dispenses his knowledge in a series of essays:


The publishing history of the Positronic Robot and Foundation stories:




The publishing history of the Positronic Robot and Empire novels, 1947-1958



The Rise and Fall of the Spacers



Articles from the Encyclopedia Galactica:



A Piece of History


By March 18, 1941, Isaac Asimov had written thirty-one stories, sold seventeen, and fourteen had been published. At that time, he considered himself nothing more than a third-rate writer. That evening, he sat down to write his thirty-second story, based on an idea suggested by Astounding editor John W. Campbell the day before. By April 8, he finished the story, titled "Nightfall", and on April 9 he took it to Campbell. Two days later, he received this letter from Campbell, and the history of science fiction was changed forever.



Cosmic Corkscrew


Science Fiction writer Michael A. Burstein pays homage to Isaac in Cosmic Corkscrew, his Hugo Award nominated story which appeared in the June 1998 issue of Analog, and honors the 60th anniversary of Asimov's submission of his first story to Astounding Science Fiction.



Asimov and Religion


Mike Brummond's scholarly essay Religion in Asimov's Writings considers the aspects of religion that appear in Asimov's fiction, and Asimov's views on religion, as expressed in his nonfiction.



Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine


Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine has a website containing feature articles, excerpts from upcoming issues, book reviews, online interviews, reprints of Isaac Asimov's editorials, and much more.



The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction


Home to Isaac Asimov's monthly science column for over thirty-three years, The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, founded in 1949, is the award-winning SF magazine which is the original publisher of SF classics like Stephen King's Dark Tower, Daniel Keyes's "Flowers for Algernon" and Walter M. Miller's A Canticle for Leibowitz. The website has selections from recent and upcoming issues, current issue contents, writer's guidelines, and subscription information.





Lists of Asimov's Works







Sources for Obtaining Asimov's Books


There are many Web sites that offer books for sale, and of course the number grows each day. A number of those are good sources for books by Asimov, and a few are listed here. Please note that the listing of these sites do not constitute an endorsement of their services.






Publishers of Asimov's Books on the Web








Reviews








A Graph of Asimov's Book Publications


It took nineteen years for Asimov to publish his first 100 books, ten years to publish the next 100, and only five years to bring the total up to 300. Thanks to Tony Neilson (tneilson@trl.oz.au), here is a graph of the number of books Asimov published each year throughout his career:

[Graph image]




Other Asimov Resources








A Few Science Fiction Resources










Author:


Edward Seiler

ejseiler@earthlink.net




 

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